A Class Diagram Tool in Java with the Flowchart Library – II

This is the second part of MindFusion step-by-step tutorial on how to create a Java application that reads the contents of a *.jar file and renders class diagram of its API. In the previous blog post we looked at the UI elements that build the application – the UI, the legend panel, the diagram elements. Now we continue with reading the class data and building the class diagram.

I. Reading the Data

The data that we need – the name of the API member, its fields, its type – enum, class, interface as well inherited classes – is stored in a helper class that we’ve created for the purpose and that is called MemberInfo.java. It is a simple class that does nothing else than storing data:

 public MemberInfo( String name, String fullName )
    {
        this.name = name;
        this.fullName = fullName;

        //lists for the methods, fields and constructors.
        methods = new ArrayList();
        fields = new ArrayList();
        constructors = new ArrayList();
        inheritsFrom = "";
        packageName = "";
        isInterface = false;
        isEnum = false;
    }

There is a list with the methods, fields and constructors, as well properties for the name of the package, the class this class inherits from as well boolean values that indicate if this is an enum or interface.

For reading the data we use only classes and methods from the official Java packages – no third party tools or libraries:

      try
        {
            //try to open the jar
            JarFile jarFile = new JarFile(pathToJar);

            //explore the elements found in the *.jar.
            Enumeration e = jarFile.entries();

            URL[] urls = {new URL("jar:file:" + pathToJar + "!/")};
            URLClassLoader cl = URLClassLoader.newInstance(urls);
            //if a class is found - read its data
            while (e.hasMoreElements())
            {
                JarEntry je = e.nextElement();
                if (je.isDirectory() || !je.getName().endsWith (".class")) {
                    continue;
                }
                // -6 because of .class file extension.
                String className = je.getName().substring(0, je.getName().length() - 6);
                className = className.replace('/', '.');
                .....

In a cycle we read all classes in the jar, parse the data we are interested in and filter data that is no relevant to us – private methods, abstract classes etc. The data we acquire for each class is stored in a new MemberInfo object that we add to a collection.

II. Diagram Elements

The diagram elements that we use to render each class are TableNode-s. We use the caption field to show the name of the class. In addition, we use the capabilities of the Java diagram library to render formatted text and add to the caption the name of the package – drawn on a new line.

            //create the TableNode
            TableNode _table = diagram.getFactory().createTableNode(10, 10, 5, 5, 2, info.memberCount());
            //set the name of the member and the package as table caption.
            String caption = "<b>" + info.getName() + "</b>";
            if(info.getPackageName().length() &gt; 0)
                caption += "\n" + info.getPackageName();
            _table.setCaption(caption);
            //center the caption
            _table.setCaptionFormat((new TextFormat(Align.Center, Align.Center)));
            //increase the default caption height
            _table.setCaptionHeight(10f);
           .....

It is important to note here that we add an identifier for each table – this will help us find the right TableNode when we later create connections:


 _table.setId(info.getFullName());

By default TableNode-s are drawn with blue. We check if the current object is enum or interface and change the color scheme accordingly:

            //add enums to the list and paint them green
            if(info.isEnum()) {
                _table.setBrush(new SolidBrush(new Color((int) 210, (int) 250, (int) 208)));
                enums.add(_table);
            }//add interfaces to the list and paint them yellow
            else if(info.isInterface()) {
                _table.setBrush(new SolidBrush(new Color((int) 250, (int) 235, (int) 140)));
                interfaces.add(_table);
            }
            else //the class nodes are blue
                _table.setBrush(new SolidBrush(new Color((int)197, (int)223, (int)238)));

Then we add table rows for the constructors, methods and fields. Each row has a cell for the image and for the definition of the member:

            //fill the first cells with data for the constructors.
            for (String constructor : info.getConstructors())
            {
                _table.getCell(0, index).setImage(constructorImage);
                _table.getCell(1, index).setText(constructor);
                index++;
            }

Finally, we look at all MemberInfo objects and draw DiagramLink between each class and the class it derives from, if any:

  for (MemberInfo info : membersList)
        {
            if(!info.getParent().isEmpty())
            {
                DiagramNode node = diagram.findNodeById (info.getFullName());
                DiagramNode parent = diagram.findNodeById( info.getParent());

                //add inheritance link
                if(node != null &amp;&amp; parent != null)
                {
                    DiagramLink link = diagram.getFactory ().createDiagramLink(node, parent);

                .......

III. Containers

Interfaces and enums are drawn in groups at the end of the TableNode-s for classes. This is done using ContainerNode-s. First, we calculate the dimensions of the ContainerNode by measuring all TableNode-s that must fit into it:

            //calculate the location of the node
            int side = (int)Math.ceil(Math.sqrt(tables.size()));
            int rows = (int)Math.ceil((double)tables.size() / side);
            double singleWidth = tables.get(0).getBounds().getWidth();
            double width = 5 * (side + 1) * coef + singleWidth * side;
            double height = (5 * (rows + 1) + 5) * coef;

            double[] rowHeights = new double[rows];
            for (int i = 0; i &lt; tables.size(); i++)
                rowHeights[i / side] = Math.max(tables.get(i).getBounds().getHeight(), rowHeights[i / side]);

            for (double h : rowHeights)
                height += h;


            //initialize the container
            ContainerNode b = diagram.getFactory().createContainerNode (0, 0, width, height);
            ....

Here the variable tables is a list with the TableNode-s that must fit into the container. After the ContainerNode is created, the tables must be added and positioned in it:

            int index = 0;
            for (TableNode e : tables)
            {
                b.add(e);

                double x = (index % side) * (5 + singleWidth);
                double y = 0;

                for (int r = 0; r &lt; index / side; r++)
                    y += 5 * coef + rowHeights[r];

                //adjust the size of the node
                e.setBounds(new Rectangle2D.Double(x + 5 * coef, y + 10 * coef,                   e.getBounds().getWidth(), e.getBounds ().getHeight()));

                index++;
            }

Finally we adjust the appearance of the ContainerNode to make it look better and in line with the TableNode-s:

            //customize the container
            b.setCaption(name);
            b.setCaptionFormat((new TextFormat(Align.Center,  Align.Center)));
            b.setHandlesStyle( HandlesStyle.HatchHandles3 );
            b.setFont(new Font("Verdana", Font.BOLD, 4));
            b.setIgnoreLayout(true);
            b.setTag(tag);
            //no shadow
            b.setShadowOffsetX(0f);
            b.setShadowOffsetY(0f);

It’s important to note that the bounds of the container must be updated for the changes to take effect:

            //update the container size.
            b.updateBounds();

IV. Diagram Layout

The last part of the application deals with diagram layout. This is very important because in the common scenario we expect to read *.jar files with tens of classes and proper visual arrangement of the flowchart is the key to its usability.

We decide to use the TreeLayout, which is meant exactly to arrange diagrams with nodes on several levels as we expect the class hierarchies to be. It is easy to apply the layout – we create an instance of it and after setting some initial customization we call its arrange method:

         TreeLayout layout = new TreeLayout();

        //the layout type is Centered
        layout.setType(TreeLayoutType.Centered);
        //allow reversed links
        layout.setReversedLinks(true);
        //the type of links will be cascading
        layout.setLinkStyle(TreeLayoutLinkType.Cascading3);
        //specify the distance between levels of tree nodes
        layout.setLevelDistance(25);
        //groups must be preserved.
        layout.setKeepGroupLayout(true);

        layout.arrange(diagram);

It is easy to understand the type of the settings we’ve used – thanks to the self-explanatory names of the layout class you can see that we specify that the TreeLayout will be centered, the links will be reversed, then we change the link style and the distance between levels. Finally, we specify that the layout of groups must be preserved.

The interesting part is at the end. We must find the ContainerNode-s with the enums and interfaces and move them to the end of the diagram. Here is how:

        // Place enums and delegates at the end
        DiagramNode enums = diagram.findNode(":enums");
        DiagramNode delegates = diagram.findNode(":interfaces");

        double x = 0;
        //calculate the location of each node to find out the last one
        for (DiagramNode node : diagram.getNodes())
        {
        	if (node instanceof TableNode)
            {
        		x = Math.max(x, node.getBounds().getX() +  node.getBounds().getWidth());
            }
        }

        //move enums to the right of the last class node.
        if (enums != null)
        {
            enums.moveTo((float)x + 5f, (float)5);
            x = enums.getBounds().getX() + enums.getBounds().getWidth ();
        }

        if (delegates != null)
        {
            delegates.moveTo((float)x + 5, 5);
        } 

We cycle through each TableNode and always move the containers to the end of the rightmost TableNode that we find. Let’s not forget to resize the diagram after we are done:

 
diagram.resizeToFitItems(5);

With this our application is ready and we test it with an arbitrary *.jar file. Here is the result:

Class Diagram Application in Java

Class Diagram Application in Java

You can download the complete source code of the sample from here:

Download the Class Diagram Tool in Java Application

MindFusion support team welcomes your questions about the Java diagram library or any other of our programming tools at the discussion board or per e-mail at support@mindfusion.eu

About Diagramming for Java Swing: MindFusion.Diagramming for Java Swing provides your Java application with all necessary functionality to create and customize a diagram. The library is very easy to integrate and program. There are numerous utility methods, rich event set, more than 100 predefined shapes. The tool supports a variety of ways to render or export the diagram, advanced node types like TreeView nodes, hierarchical nodes, tables, container nodes and many more. There are 15 automatic layouts, various input / output options and fully customizable appearance. A detailed list with JDiagram’s features is uploaded here. You can check the online demo to see some of the functionality implemented.

Diagramming for Java Swing is royalty free, there are no distribution fees. Licenses depend on the count of developers using the tool – check here the prices.

A Class Diagram Tool in Java with the Flowchart Library – I

This blog post is a step-by-step guide on how to create a tool that parses *.jar files and builds the class hierarchy. The visualization of the diagram is performed by MindFusion Java Swing Diagram library.

Here is an image of the final application:

Class Library Tool in Java

Class Library Tool in Java

In part one we will take a look at the controls that build the user interface for the application.

I. UI Controls

We will use three controls from the diagram library:

    private Diagram diagram;
    private DiagramView diagramView;
    private ZoomControl zoomer;

One JScrollPane:

private JScrollPane _scrollPane;

and a JPanel for the legend and a JMenuBar.

    JPanel controlsPanel = new JPanel();
    JMenuBar menuBar;

Those controls build the user interface. At the top is the menu bar with menus for handling the *.jar files. In the center is a scrollable area that contains the diagram. Right to it is a zoom control. At the bottom is the panel with the legend – images and text that explain the colors and symbols on the class diagram.

II. The Diagram Controls

The three diagram controls are the Diagram, the DiagramView and the ZoomControl. The diagram needs a diagramView to render itself onto. The diagramView users a scrollPane to provide scroll functionality for the flowchart. The zoomControl is a typical Java Swing control, we set a few customization options on it to make it pass the layout of our application.

       //diagram initialization
        diagram = new Diagram();
        diagram.setAutoResize(AutoResize.RightAndDown);

We set auto resize for the diagram and assign it to the diagramView:

        //initialize a diagramView that will render the diagram.
        diagramView = new DiagramView(diagram);
        diagramView.setVisible(true);

The scrollPane is initialized with the diagramView and scrolls automatically when the view is bigger than the available size:

         //use a scroll pane to host large diagrams
        _scrollPane = new JScrollPane(diagramView);
        _scrollPane.setVisible(true);
        _scrollPane.setAutoscrolls(true);

The zoomControl is also attached to the diagramView. It’s important that we set its Dimension, the width will be used by the Java layout manager to calculate the available space for it on the application.

        //provide a zoomer for the diagram
        zoomer = new ZoomControl();
        zoomer.setView(diagramView);
        zoomer.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(70, 50));
        zoomer.setVisible(true); 

The arrangement of the controls in the JFrame is done with the BorderLayout. It’s important that we set the layout before we start adding the controls:

     getContentPane().setLayout(new BorderLayout());
     this.add(zoomer, BorderLayout.EAST);
     this.add(createLegendPanel(), BorderLayout.SOUTH);

The zoomer is to the right, the legend panel is at the bottom. The last control that we add is the scrollPane with the diagram, we align it to the center, which means that all the available space would be allocated to her.

     this.add(_scrollPane, BorderLayout.CENTER);

Finally, we create the menu bar.

     this.setJMenuBar(createMenuBar());

III. The Legend Panel

The legend panel is a JPanel with BoxLayout of type “LINE_AXIS”.

        JPanel controlsPanel = new JPanel();
        controlsPanel.setLayout(new BoxLayout(controlsPanel, BoxLayout.LINE_AXIS));
        controlsPanel.setBorder(BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder(10, 10, 10, 10));
        controlsPanel.add(Box.createHorizontalGlue());

The legend items are ImageIcon-s – for each symbol in the diagram there’s an icon. We have also created images for the colors of the diagram. Each icon is rendered with explanation label.

Generally, each item on the LegendPanel is initialized like this:

        //create labels for each item on the legend
        JLabel label = new JLabel("Constructor", constructorIcon, JLabel.CENTER);
        label.setAlignmentX(JComponent.CENTER_ALIGNMENT);
        controlsPanel.add(label);
        controlsPanel.add(Box.createRigidArea(new Dimension(10, 0)));
        controlsPanel.add(Box.createHorizontalGlue());

The layout distributes evenly the available space between the items and we get an easy-to-read legend at the bottom of the application.

IV. The Menu

The menu at the top is implemented as a JMenuBar, which uses mnemonic keys and accelerators to grant access to the menu items with keyboard shortcuts. The only menu item and submenu items currently present are File -> Open jar.

        //Build the first menu.
        menu = new JMenu("File");
        menu.setMnemonic(KeyEvent.VK_F);
        menu.getAccessibleContext().setAccessibleDescription(
                "File operations");
        menuBar.add(menu);

The “Open jar” command uses action listener, which brings up the Open File diagolg. This is a JFileChooser, which filters all files except *.jar files.

     //the method that handles events
    public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e)
    {
        //identify the command
        if ("open_jar".equals(e.getActionCommand())) {

            //a list with MemberInfo objects that hold class info
            ArrayList membersList = new ArrayList();
            fileChooser = new JFileChooser();

            //set the default directory to this file's directory
            fileChooser.setCurrentDirectory(currFile);

            //filter only *.jar files
            FileFilter filter = new FileNameExtensionFilter(null, "jar");
            fileChooser.setFileFilter(filter);
            fileChooser.removeChoosableFileFilter(fileChooser.getAcceptAllFileFilter());
            .......

If the method confirms that the user has selected a valid jar, the path to the file is provided to the method that reads and parses the jar, which will be topic for the second part of this tutorial.

The whole sample is available for direct download from this link:

Download the Class Diagram Tool in Java Application

MindFusion support team welcomes your questions about the Java diagram library or any other of our programming tools at the discussion board or per e-mail at support@mindfusion.eu

About Diagramming for Java Swing: MindFusion.Diagramming for Java Swing provides your Java application with all necessary functionality to create and customize a diagram. The library is very easy to integrate and program. There are numerous utility methods, rich event set, more than 100 predefined shapes. The tool supports a variety of ways to render or export the diagram, advanced node types like TreeView nodes, hierarchical nodes, tables, container nodes and many more. There are 15 automatic layouts, various input / output options and fully customizable appearance. A detailed list with JDiagram’s features is uploaded here. You can check the online demo to see some of the functionality implemented.

Diagramming for Java Swing is royalty free, there are no distribution fees. Licenses depend on the count of developers using the tool – check here the prices.

Database Schema with the Java Diagram Library – Part I

In this blog post we’ll build a database diagram reading the metadata of the sample MySQL database sakila.

Click here to watch the video that goes with these tutorials.

I. Configuration

For our sample to work we need to add the JDiagram.jar package to the project and a JDBC driver for MySQL. We download the JDBC driver from https://dev.mysql.com/downloads/connector/j/ and we add mysql-connector-java-5.1.40.jar to the libs folder of our project where we have placed JDiagram.jar.

The structure of the Class Diagram Java project.

The structure of the Class Diagram Java project.

II. Helper Classes

We create several helper classes that will handle the connection to the database and re-creation of the database metadata in a format which we can use to build the DB diagram.

1. We have created two classes for connecting to the sakila MySql database and reading the metadata. For the tables. In general we are interested in the names of the tables, the columns in them with column name, column data type and column data size. We also want the relationships in the database, with the primary and foreign keys. The classes that provide us with this information are DBConnection, which binds to the database and DBMetaData, which reads the database with the help of the DatabaseMetaData and ResultSet classes of the Java platform.
2. For the purpose of our project we have created two more classes. The first one represents a column in the database – DBColumn. It has just a few fields:

public class DBColumn {

    public String name;
    public String type;
    public String size;
    public boolean primaryKey;

The other class describes a relation in the database. It is equally simple:

public class DBRelation {

    public String pk_key;
    public String pk_table;

    public String fk_key;
    public String fk_table;

3. We have defined an ArrayList tables variable for the table names. We call the respective method of the DBMetaData class that reads the table names and populates the tables list.

III. UI Controls

We will use an instance of the Diagram class, a DiagramView control, a JScrollPane and a zoom control. What we want to show is a diagram pane that is scrollable both horizontally and vertically and a zoom control next to it.

We create the diagram and make sure it will resize itself when needed:

//diagram initialization
diagram = new Diagram();
diagram.setAutoResize(AutoResize.RightAndDown);

The diagram needs a diagramView to render itself onto. We create one and add it to a JScrollPane. The scroll pane provides the necessary scrollbars if the flowchart gets too big.

//initialize a diagramView that will render the diagram.
diagramView = new DiagramView(diagram);
diagramView.setVisible(true);

//use a scroll pane to host large diagrams
_scrollPane = new JScrollPane(diagramView);
_scrollPane.setVisible(true);
_scrollPane.setAutoscrolls(true);

The Java Diagram library provides a handful of auxiliary controls and in our sample we’ll use the Zoom control:

//provide a zoomer for the diagram
zoomer = new ZoomControl();
zoomer.setView(diagramView);
zoomer.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(70, 50));
zoomer.setVisible(true);

We use the setView() method to associate the zoom control with the diagramView. The BorderLayout algorithm helps us arrange the controls. First, we apply it on the JFrame ContentPane and then we align the zoom control to the right. Finally, we add the JScrollPane to the center, which lets it use all the available space left by the zoomer:

getContentPane().setLayout(new BorderLayout());
this.add(zoomer, BorderLayout.EAST);
this.add(_scrollPane, BorderLayout.CENTER);

IV. Creating the Tables

We first read the data for the DB columns and then for each table in the database we create a diagram TableNode.

ArrayList tableData = DBMetaData.getColumnsMetadata(tableName);

We use the Factory class of the diagram library:

Dimension tableSize = new Dimension(50, 30);
TableNode _table = diagram.getFactory().createTableNode(10, 10, 50, tableData.size() * 8, 4, tableData.size());
_table.setCaption("<b>" + tableName + "</b>");
_table.setId(tableName);

The createTableNode() method that we use takes as arguments the location of the table node, its width and height and the count of rows and columns. We use HTML formatting to make the caption of the table bold. For caption and for id of the tableNode we use the name of the table.

Since we need to use HTML styling on text in the diagram nodes we must specify:

diagram.setEnableStyledText(true);
 

Let’s add some more customization on the table nodes:

_table.setCaptionFormat(new TextFormat(Align.Center, Align.Center));
_table.setCaptionHeight(7f);
_table.setAllowResizeColumns(true);
_table.setShape(SimpleShape.RoundedRectangle);
_table.setBrush(new SolidBrush(new Color((int)204, (int)224, (int)255)));

The caption is aligned in the center and we increase slightly the default caption height. Then we allow users to resize table columns with the mouse and we change the table shape from rectangle to a rectangle with rounded edges. Finally, we color the table nodes with a light blue brush.

Note that once Factory creates a node it gets added to the DiagramNodes collection of the control automatically.
Now let’s populate the table with data:

int rowIndex = 0;

for(DBColumn column: tableData)
{
    _table.getCell(1, rowIndex).setText("<b>" + column.name + "</b>");
    _table.getCell(2, rowIndex).setText(column.type);
    _table.getCell(3, rowIndex).setText(column.size);

    //if the column is a primary key - set an image. If not, leave it empty.
    if(column.isPrimaryKey())
    {
        try {

            File pathToFile = new File("res/key.png");
            Image image = ImageIO.read(pathToFile);
            _table.getCell(0,rowIndex).setImage(image);


        } catch (IOException ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    rowIndex++;

}

Here we cycle through all DBColumn objects that we have created using the database metadata. In each row in the table node we write the name of the database field, the data type and the data size. Note that we start with the second column (index 1) because the first one is reserved for an image of the primary or foreign key, if applicable. So far we have gathered information only for the primary key.

Since we want the image to occupy the first column we must make some adjustments to the TableNode and its size:

//adjust the size of the tables and columns.
_table.resizeToFitText(true);
Rectangle2D.Float t_size = _table.getBounds();
_table.getColumns().get(0).setWidth(7);
_table.resize(t_size.width + 7, t_size.height);
_table.resizeToFitImage();

First we use resizeToFitText to make the table auto calculate the size it needs based on the text it holds. This, unfortunately would not include space for the image, so we must correct it manually. We resize the first column with 7 pixels to allow the image to fit and we increase the size of the table as well. Then we call resizeToFitImage() to let the TableNode update its new size.

With that we finish the first part of our tutorial. Part II will walk you through the steps to create the relationships among the nodes and arrange the database diagram using the automatic layout algorithms provided with the Java Diagram library. Here is our diagram so far:

Java Database Schema: Tables

Java Database Schema: Tables

You can download the complete sample from this link. The sample contains the sakila MySQL database with a PDF file with instructions how to install it if you haven’t already. You will need to have an installed and running MySQL server. Remember to change the login data in the DBConnection.java file to match your login credentials.

The second part of this tutorial is here.

About Diagramming for Java Swing: MindFusion.Diagramming for Java Swing provides your Java application with all necessary functionality to create and customize a diagram. The library is very easy to integrate and program. There are numerous utility methods, rich event set, more than 100 predefined shapes. The tool supports a variety of ways to render or export the diagram, advanced node types like TreeView nodes, hierarchical nodes, tables, container nodes and many more. There are 15 automatic layouts, various input / output options and fully customizable appearance. A detailed list with JDiagram’s features is uploaded here. You can check the online demo to see some of the functionality implemented.

Diagramming for Java Swing is royalty free, there are no distribution fees. Licenses depend on the count of developers using the tool – check here the prices.

Diagram Library for Java Swing, V4.3

We have released the new version of the Java Diagram library. Here is a brief summary of the new features:

Fluent API

Builder classes in com.mindfusion.diagramming.builders package add support for fluent programming style. Static with and instance init methods in DiagramItem, DiagramItemStyle and Layout -derived classes return a builder instance that can be used to set up respective new or existing objects.

DiagramLink improvements

  • The component no longer keeps a separate segmentCount field, removing a common source of errors. The SegmentCount property now calculates its value from ControlPoints elements. The updateFromPoints(updateGroups, updateSegments) overload has been removed too.
  • SegmentCount setter no longer refuses changing number of segments if auto-routing is enabled or the link is a self-loop.
  • The new Spline element of LinkShape enumeration draws links as interpolating splines that pass through all of their control points:
Java Diagram Library: Spline Links

Java Diagram Library: Spline Links

Enum types

Old-style enumeration classes with static finals have been replaced by enum types, improving type checking and auto-completion support. This change will not affect your code if only passing enum members to methods from the API. If storing them in fields on the other hand, you must change the field type from int to respective enum type.

Several bug fixes
We have fixed a setLicenseKey problem and a bug with the SvgExporter.

You can find details about the new release at the official announcement page here.

The trial version is available for download from the following link:

Download MindFusion.Diagramming for Java Swing, V4.3 Trial Version

Technical support
MindFusion puts special effort in providing high quality technical support to all its current and future clients. You can post your questions about Diagramming for Java at the forum, help desk or at support@mindfusion.eu. All support inquiries are usually answered within hours of being received.

About Diagramming for Java Swing: MindFusion.Diagramming for Java Swing provides your Java application with all necessary functionality to create and customize a diagram. The library is very easy to integrate and program. There are numerous utility methods, rich event set, more than 100 predefined shapes. The tool supports a variety of ways to render or export the diagram, advanced node types like TreeView nodes, hierarchical nodes, tables, container nodes and many more. There are 15 automatic layouts, various input / output options and fully customizable appearance. A detailed list with JDiagram’s features is uploaded here. You can check the online demo to see some of the functionality implemented.

Diagramming for Java Swing is royalty free, there are no distribution fees. Licenses depend on the count of developers using the tool – check here the prices.